Those calling for more equitable state high school basketball tournaments in Connecticut might soon be smiling.

The CIAC has set a plan to again change the boys basketball state tournaments which, if formally approved, will go into practice on a one-year trial basis for the 2016-17 season.

The new plan is a return to the division format rather than the class format based on enrollment now in place.

The move comes as a response to concerns over schools of choice, which can pull from multiple communities, becoming too dominant in their respective classes that are based strictly on enrollment.

“As you know, there has been much attention paid over the years to the perceived equity issues within our basketball tournament divisions,” CIAC director Karissa Niehoff said in a statement Thursday. “We have been using a success formula to assist us in our determination of divisions, but our committee has continued to consider options to go further. Our boys basketball committee established a sub-committee of seven members who have decades of experience as coaches, athletic directors and school administrators. The sub-committee presented a proposal to representatives of both the boys and girls committees and the CIAC that introduces a new tournament division placement measure.”

The new plan would get rid of the LL, L, M and S classes, replacing them with Division 1 for the larger and more successful schools followed by Divisions 2, 3 and 4.

The new divisions would be based on both enrollment and performance.

After considering enrollment the CIAC committee looked at the number of appearances for each school in state quarterfinal, semifinal and championship games over the last 14 seasons.

Based on that criteria the teams in the state were ranked 1 through 184.

Some feel this is a fair way to go about the state tournament while others see some flaws in the new plan.

“I don’t understand how or why they are coming up with this,” said Immaculate coach Nelson Mingachos, who lead the Mustangs to the Class S boys championship this year. “I think if you look at the last 14 years then you are talking about guys who are 30 years old now determining where teams will be seeded. I think the CIAC needs to look just at the current year and at the end of the season seed the teams in the four classes.”

Some of those concerns are being addressed as part of the final plan. The CIAC says a committee will look at the divisions before each school year ends and make common sense adjustments when necessary.

“A newly established sub-committee would review the divisions and identify any potential issues for teams that might significantly impact tournament performance,” Niehoff said. “For example, a smaller school team might have come off a run of four extremely successful years — placing them in the highest division — and yet have graduated their starters. Such a situation might prompt this sub-committee to place them in a division different from what the enrollment and success factors might have established.”

The committee and the Connecticut High School Coaches Association have both approved the proposal, which now must be approved by the state’s athletic directors in August before going to the CIAC Board of Control for approval.

“I am for this and will vote for it because it is more equitable,” Stamford athletic director Jim Moriarty said. “I really feel the Catholic schools should play their own state tournament, but that probably won’t happen. But any way they try to straighten this situation out I am for it.”

The plan now calls for 40 schools in Division 1, 47 in both Divisions 2 and 3 and 50 in Division 4. Those numbers are close to last season’s classes where it broke down like this: LL (41), L (46), M (47) and S (52).

The divisional numbers could change as schools can apply to move up to Division 1 as Weaver did this past season moving up from L to LL.

Teams can only request a move to Division 1 and the divisions are set before the season and not based on regular season records so as to avoid the tanking problem which caused the divisions to be scrapped a decade ago.

The new divisions should be released by September, according to the CIAC.

Scott.Ericson@scni.com; @EricsonSports