NEW CANAAN — A neighbor of Grace Farms has sued the town, apparently not appeased by a detailed zoning decision allowing the popular attraction to continue operating.

Timothy Curt and Dona Bissonnette, of 1218 Smith Ridge Road, filed a suit in state Superior Court in Stamford on Monday against the Planning and Zoning Commission after it approved a list of 101 new conditions giving Grace Farms a special permit to operate. The couple’s property abuts Grace Farms.

The suit claims that because the commission approved Grace Farms for multiple uses, the plaintiffs have and will suffer economic damage to their property.

According to the suit, Curt and Bissonnette are asking the commission’s decision be reversed, as well as other relief. Curt has another lawsuit pending against Grace Farms, claiming the destruction of wetlands on his property as a result of runoff from construction of the site.

The town’s planning and zoning department said they could not comment on the pending litigation.

In April, the Grace Farms Foundation filed an application with the Planning and Zoning Commission asking to amend the town’s zoning regulations to allow for multiple principal uses on a property, and for a renewed special permit that would better encapsulate Grace’s religious, foundational and eleemosynary

(philanthropic) uses.

After nearly a year of public hearings and deliberation among the commission members, the amendment to the town’s zoning regulations was passed by a narrow margin (5 to 4) in July, followed by final approval of Grace’s special permit application in September, albeit with 101 conditions of approval.

The conditions, meant to appease neighbors and reel in the broad scope of activities at Grace, included limitations on the number and size of events annually, regulations on light usage, landscaping and fencing.

The newest lawsuit claims the commission failed to follow Connecticut General Statutes concerning record of notice. The plaintiffs said the post-hearing legal notices following the commission’s decision were “defective, incomplete and misleading” and that the commission failed to file a copy of the changes with the town clerk.

The suit claims that because the commission approved Grace Farms for multiple uses, the plaintiffs have and will suffer economic damage to their property.

In speaking at a zoning hearing in June regarding Grace Farms, Curt said since his family had purchased their house in 2003, they had built their “dream home,” particularly their backyard.

The pair created gardens, a Japanese tea house, and patios in the rear of their property. But their carefully cultivated backyard was soon spoiled, Curt said. beginning with the issuance of a special permit and construction in 2013 of the adjacent Grace Farms Foundation River Building, which sits on a hill above the Curt-Bissonnette home.

“I have no sense of privacy. I have no sense of, ‘I’m home.’ It’s just a complete invasion, and we just feel like we’re on display,” Curt said at the June hearing. “It’s been horrendous for our lives since construction started.”

Staff writer Justin Papp contributed to this report.