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Wednesday, July 23, 2014

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Glass House director to define New Canaan treasure

Published 10:22 am, Monday, March 31, 2014
  • Henry Urbach, director of the Glass House, will deliver "The Glass House, Reconsidered" Sunday,  April 6, at the New Canaan Library. Photo: Contributed Photo, Contributed / New Canaan News Contributed
    Henry Urbach, director of the Glass House, will deliver "The Glass House, Reconsidered" Sunday, April 6, at the New Canaan Library. Photo: Contributed Photo, Contributed

 

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Henry Urbach, director of the Glass House, will make his first public speaking engagement at 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 6, at the New Canaan Library to deliver "The Glass House, Reconsidered."

A question-and-answer session will take place at the conclusion of the talk, followed by a reception.

Urbach, who became director in April 2012, will explore the history of the Glass House and how it has evolved since it opened to the public. Urbach will also interpret architect Philip Johnson's creative endeavor and discuss the site's transformation into a center for new art and ideas.

The 2014 season, which runs from May through November, launches with "Veil," an installation by Japanese artist Fujiko Nakaya. It is the first site-specific project to engage the Glass House itself, wrapping it in a dense mist periodically during the day. New, too, are self-guided tours and Glass House Presents, a series of public programs launching in May with landscape architect Edwina von Gal.

Built by Johnson between 1949 and 1995, the Glass House is a 49-acre campus in New Canaan with many Johnson-designed buildings, a collection of modern art and a pastoral landscape. It is a National Trust Historic Site.

Previously, Urbach was curator of architecture and design at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and, prior to that, directed Henry Urbach Architecture, a gallery of contemporary art and architecture in New York.

He holds a master's degree in architecture from Columbia University, and a master's degree in history and theory

of architecture from Princeton University. He has taught at several schools of architecture, including UCLA and Yale University, and has written extensively about art, architecture and culture.

Admission to the lecture is free, but tickets are required and can be obtained by registering at newcanaanlibrary.org.