(skip this header)

New Canaan News

Sunday, September 21, 2014

newcanaannewsonline.com Businesses

« Back to Article

Education reform topic for New Canaan church's seminar

Published 2:40 pm, Friday, December 7, 2012
Larger | Smaller
Email This
Font

More Information

Fact box
Page 1 of 1

Nitzan Pelman is the next speaker in First Presbyterian Church's adult education class "Social Entrepreneurs & Philanthropic Engagement: The Church as Catalyst for Social Change."

She will speak from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 12, at the church, 178 Oenoke Ridge, on "Education Reform: Citizen Schools."

The church is hosting a set of speakers who can share their different perspectives on how to achieve the most impact and the most enjoyment from philanthropy. Topics include broad discussions around venture philanthropy, social impact bonds and double-bottom line investing and include more specific presentations around education reform, citizen engagement and workforce development.

Pelman opened the New York region of Citizen Schools in 2007 and serves as its founding executive director, overseeing 100 staff members who work with more than 1,000 low-income students in six public schools across three boroughs. She is also responsible for raising $5.1 million in fiscal year 2013.

Citizen Schools was founded in 1995 to bring new solutions to the education reform landscape and continues to re-imagine the school day by becoming one of the advocates in America for a longer school day. Citizen Schools partners with public middle schools to lengthen the school day for children in low-income communities.

Prior to joining Citizen Schools, Pelman worked at the New York City Department of Education for four years in the Klein/Bloomberg administration. In that time, she served as the assistant director of the Office of New Teacher Induction and helped create a mentoring program for 6,500 new teachers. In her final year at the DOE, she developed, designed and implemented the citywide "learning environment survey" administered to 1.8 million people through the Office of Accountability. Previously, she served as the first director of development for Teach for America New York.

She is a graduate of New York University's Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and Stern College for Women.

For information, call 203-966-0002 or visit www.fpcnc.org.